Fake New Balance Advertisement Causes Social Media Fire Storm

In the midst of the Baltimore Riots, New Balance is putting out its own fire storm.

Recently what appeared to be screen shots from New Balance’s company website surfaced the internet using protesters to “promote” the company. Twitter users have retweeted the fake screen shots over 1,500 times and favorited the tweet more than 700 times.

New Balance took to social media to tell users that the advertisement was not generated by New Balance and asked that users do not retweet the post:

“This is clearly not a New Balance generated post – we ask that you please do not re-tweet.”

  
“We did not regenerate the ad.”

  
Check out the fake screen shots below and tell us what you think:

   

   

When Crisis Strikes: Awkward Moments In PR

1. That awkward moment when Clorox tweeted “where’s the bleach” after the launch of multicultural emoji’s. 

   

2.  That awkward moment when the United States Postal Services launches their “Maya Forever” stamps with a quote that Maya Angelou didn’t write.

 

Yikes! Have you seen any other awkward PR moments this week? Comment below or tweet us and let us know. 

How Not To Get Retweeted

As an entrepreneur, when I write a blog post, my objective is to get other people to read it and take something away from it. Sometimes this happens simultaneously and sometimes I don’t get many views at all. But that is the nature of the game.

Of course we all want 100+ retweets and thousands of views on our post but for most of us, that will never happen. There’s a lot you can do to get retweeted but lets start with what not to do.

Here is a list of of 5 things not to do if you want to get retweeted:

1. Asking for retweets is a huge no. If you want to be retweeted, create meaningful content for your viewers.

2. Sending the “I made a new blog post” tweet with a link to your site to everyone on your timeline is a quick way to get unfollowed and blocked. If you want people to see your post, add relevant #hashtags to your tweet.

3. Speaking of hashtags, using trending topics in your post to solicit viewers when they have no relevance to your blog topic shows that you have no idea how to use social media. This makes no sense and screams desparation. You will also not get retweeted. Always remember to use hashtags that are relevant to your blog topic.

4. If your link looks like this: http://tjecommunications.com/2014/11/16/why-kim-kardashian-is-still-winning/ it is too long and will probably not be retweeted. Lucky for you, most of the time Twitter shortens the link for you. There are many tools out there to shrink links; such as Hootsuite.

5. Posting link after link and tweeting like robot. If you post only links to your blog, you will not get retweets and probably not even followers. Try engaging in Twitter chats and interacting with followers to build rapport.

Am I missing something? Comment below.

4 Things We Can Learn from Reese’s Maggot Crisis

Being on social media, for a brand, means more than scheduling posts of the office cat and random company updates. When a brand decides to join the world wide web on a social media platform, they are opening themselves up to the harsh unfiltered thoughts of consumers around the world.

Recently, a disturbing video of maggots coming out of a Reese’s Peanut Buttercup has surfaced all over YouTube and even got a hit on popular gossip site World Star Hip Hop. The video consisted of a consumer breaking open her Reese’s only to find live maggots inside of the candy. After searching through YouTube, it appears that multiple consumers have had the same incident occur over the last year.

The video has since gone viral and caused a frenzy amongst peanut buttercup lovers who are second guessing their favorite candy. Some have even vowed not to eat the candy ever again!

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Reese’s have since done damage control on social media by responding to inquiries from consumers in a timely fashion and exemplified a great example of how to respond in a crisis situation.

As a small or women owned business, it is inevitable that you will run into mishaps here and there. Even the large companies like Reese’s have their hiccups. The worst thing you can do in a situation is ignore your consumers when they are experiencing issues with your product or service.

The best practice for crisis communication:

1. Listen to the comments and concerns of your consumers

2. Empathize with the consumer by putting yourself in their shoes. How would you feel if you found maggots embedded in your chocolate?

3. Acknowledge that you are aware of the issues

4. Take preventative action so that an issue like this never occurs again

Sure, I will probably not have a Reese’s Cup for quite some time, but I admire their timely responses to consumers and their willingness to make themselves vulnerable by providing the information and working on the next preventative steps.

If you were Reese’s, how would you have handled this situation?