Content Planning: Why & How

2018 is here and it’s time for you to get your content strategy revamped and ready for the new year. If you do not plan out your content, you’re not giving yourself the opportunity to truly measure your success.
As a one-woman shop, we have two major roles to play: we have to work IN the business and ON the business. Planning out your content will give you more time to focus on other major tasks that are going to take your business to the next level.

What exactly is content?

Content is king. It is everything you see from a business including videos, blogs, posts on social media, eCourses, etc.

How do I plan my content?

  1. You need to decide what type of content you want to circulate and how you plan to disseminate every piece of content you produce. For example, if you decide to create videos and you plan to post them on social media, you need to remember you will have to create the blog content in addition to your social media content.
  2. Next, you should think about frequency. How often do you plan to produce content? Too much content may cause people to ignore you if it’s not of quality, not enough content may cause people to forget you. Find your happy medium.
  3. Find the right tools and resources that work for you. From scheduling tools, to editing tools, do your research and find out what works best for your brand, and your budget. There are a lot of free tools out there to help you get started. Keep in mind as you grow, you may want to start to investing in some platforms that will make sure life easier.
  4. Keep track of how long it takes you to work on each piece of content. This will help you understand which projects need to take priority, and which you can hold off on. As your business grows, you may want to start delegating some of these tasks to employees or third parties if it is taking up too much of your time.
  5. If you’re a visual person like me, you should create a content calendar so that you can keep track of which content is going out, and which platforms they are going to. I use a simple Excel Document that is color-coded for each platform I use. Join my mailing list to get your free content calendar template.

To be completely transparent, I fully understand how hard it is to plan your content in advance and sometimes, I don’t. However, when I do, it is completely life changing for my business and allows me to be able to put my time towards other things.

Download my template and get started on planning out the remainder of January and the first few weeks of February.

Happy Planning!

#BlkWomeninBiz: Shanequa J, Owner of Barcode Glam

Shanequa was born in Akron but raised in Cleveland, OH. She always wanted to be a fashion designer but when life happened, plans had to change.

She attended the University of Cincinnati but dropped out after 2 years. Later, she attended Brown Aveda Institute where she became a Licensed Esthetician; specializing in threading and waxing.

Her first business idea was to open up an esthetic shop. However, since she didn’t have a lot of money or capital, so she decided to start something that would be more efficient but ultimately help her reach the end goal. Her love for shoes gave her the idea to open an online shoe boutique. She put her ideas on paper and decided on the name, Barcode Glam. After that, she created her logo, invested in inventory, and began vending at events to build her brand. Her ultimate goal is to merge both Barclode Glam and her esthetician business.

In 2016, she was ready to move forward and found the perfect location in Walnut Hills of Cincinnati, OH. Her heart was set on the space and she event spent $500 on an architect to create the design and floor plan. She submitted the plan to the building owner but they decided they did not want any boutiques in the building. Ironically, during this time there was a lot of gentrification happening in the area. Leaving Shanequa to believe it was not just boutiques they didn’t want, it was her.

Shanequa knows that eventually she will be able to merge these businesses. She believes he denial of the space was a good thing because Barcode Glam is steadily growing. Next time instead of leasing a space, Shanequa plans to buy a building.

Being a black woman in business makes Shanequa feel empowered, especially when she gets to network with like-minded women. Her advice for anyone considering to take the leap and become a business owner themselves: “Pay for what you need to grow your business.”

She also suggests you truly understand your target market and what they would want to purchase; not what you think they would want to purchase.

Shanequa, thank you for your resilience and stepping out on faith to become a black woman in business!

Head over to barcodeglam.com to shop and learn more!

Know a woman who should be featured in the #BlkWomeninBiz series? Complete the form below.

#BlkWomeninBiz: Adrienne Ruff

Adrienne has always had a passion for fashion, but her creativity and love for design is used in what some may consider a nontraditional way.

Originally from Central New Jersey, Adrienne’s family relocated to Columbus where she spent majority of her childhood. She attended Northland High School and after graduation, she briefly attended Columbus State Community College (CSCC) and later transferred to University of Cincinnati (UC). She studied business marketing, but after three years, she knew that fashion was her purpose. After spending so much time in her major, she was hesitant to change it so she chose to stick it through.

During her junior year of college, she decided to take some time off as she was preparing for one of her biggest challenges; becoming a mother. Later, she pursued a career in real estate and successfully obtained her license.

Adrienne always knew she wanted to be an entrepreneur. She had come up with a lot of business ideas, but had to figure out how to monetize them. Her first idea in 2001, was a mobile spa party business for young girls. A great idea that was short lived.

Her current business, Adrienne Ruff Event Co,, was right under her nose all along. Adrienne’s family has been in the catering business for over 20 years. She would always work at the events assisting in any way she could; from serving food, to rearranging and offering suggestions on the set up. One day it clicked! She could use her passion for fashion and design, to create extravagant event set ups. Adrienne would become an event designer.

The first thing she did was research and practice. Secondly, she started volunteering her services to friends and families to gain experience, display her talents, and build her portfolio. Then, she created a website and started booking a few events throughout the year. At first it was a hobby, but she knew that corporate America was not where she wanted to spend her life. Eventually she started networking and forming relationships with other event planners to gain exposure. She also had a mentor who would tell her the ins and outs of the industry and helped her think strategically about her business.

Some of the challenges that Adrienne had to face were within. She had to be more comfortable networking and creating relationships that were outside her inner circle. When she first started, naturally she was intimidated by those who had been in the industry for some time.

“I was intimidated by the veterans who’d been doing this for years. I never thought I would get hired for an event because there were so many that were better than me, who had more exposure than me, and more experience.”

She soon realized that was far from true. She began to study some of the successful people in the industry and created her own niche.

Seeing other female minority business owners be successful lets Adrienne know that she can do it too. She also wants to become that example for those coming after her. Whether she believes it or not, she is already doing that flawlessly.

One dose of advice from Adrienne for those looking to launch their own event planning business:

“Just do it! Don’t be afraid to ask to volunteer for the experience. It’s never too late to start, and my number one piece of advice is: network!”

Adrienne, thank you for setting an example and being amongst a beautiful tribe of #BlkWomeninBiz. Your resilience and positivity is what drives and motivate many young entrepreneurs, like myself, to keep pushing until we reach the top!

Know another #BlkWomeninBiz killing it in her field? Send your submission below.